Sun And The Skin

Monday August 7, 2017 at 1:03pm

Sun And The Skin

The sun can do a lot of good. It regulates sleep cycles, stimulates the body's production of vitamin D, and enhances feelings of well-being. But there's also a downside: Exposure to sun can lead to wrinkles, age spots, and skin cancer.  

In fact, sunshine is considered the single biggest cause of visible aging. But you don't have to succumb to the damaging rays. Even if you haven't been sun savvy in the past, it's never too late to start protecting your skin, says Darrell S. Rigel, MD, clinical professor of dermatology at New York University School of Medicine in New York City. Here are a few important skin care tips for sun protection.  

Avoid sun exposure

The best way to prevent a sunburn is to avoid sun exposure. Stay out of the midday sun (from 10 in the morning to 4 in the afternoon), which is the strongest sunlight. Find shade if you need to be outdoors. 

The best way to prevent a sunburn is to avoid sun exposure. Stay out of the midday sun (from 10 in the morning to 4 in the afternoon), which is the strongest sunlight. Find shade if you need to be outdoors. 

Wear Protective clothing 

- Other ways to protect yourself from the sun include wearing protective clothing, such as: •  Hats with wide 4 in. (10 cm) brims that cover your neck, ears, eyes, and scalp.  

- Sunglasses with UV ray protection, to prevent eye damage.

- Loose-fitting, tightly woven clothing that covers your arms and legs.  

- Clothing made with sun protective fabric. These clothes have a special label that tells you how effective they are in protecting your skin from ultraviolet rays.

Sunscreen protection

-  If you can't avoid being in the sun, use a sunscreen to help protect your skin while you are in the sun.

-  Be sure to read the information on the sunscreen label about its SPF value and how much protection it gives your skin. Follow the directions on the label.  For applying the sunscreen so it is most effective in protecting your skin from the sun's ultraviolet rays.

- Water washes sunscreen off, and the cooling effect of the water can make you think you're not getting burned. Water also reflects ultraviolet (UV) rays, increasing your exposure.Water-resistant sunscreen is needed if sweating or contact with water is likely.

- Sunscreen should be reapplied straight after you've been in water – even if it's "water resistant" – and after towel drying, sweating, or when it may have rubbed off.

 

» Categories: Sleep
Add to: Facebook Add to: Google Add to: Twitter

Comments

There aren't any comments for this post yet. Why not be the first to comment?

Leave a Comment

Your Name  
Email Address  
(kept hidden)
Website
Comment  
Human Validation Check  
What is 20 - 9 ? Answer